Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals V

This post is part of a series of blog-posts about Microsoft SQL Server R Services:

  1. Microsoft SQL Server 2016 R Services Installation
  2. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals I
  3. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals II
  4. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals III
  5. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals IV
  6. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals V (this post)
  7. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals VI
  8. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals VII
  9. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals VIII
  10. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals IX
  11. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals X
  12. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XI
  13. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XII
  14. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XIII
  15. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XIV
  16. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XV
  17. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XVI
  18. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XVII
  19. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XVIII
  20. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XIX
  21. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XX
  22. More to come (hopefully)

This post is the sixth post about Microsoft SQL Server R Services, and the fifth post that drills down into the internal of how it works. In Internals - III and Internals - IV, we looked at how the launchpad service creates RTerm processes when we execute an external script.

The Internals - IV post came about due to an email from Bob Albright (@bob_albright), pointing me to some resources (a blog-post) regarding the processes the launchpad service creates.

In his email Bob also, kindly enough, attached some code. The code highlighted some behavior when creating the RTerm processes, especially around parallelism. In this blog-post we'll follow up on that and look into the effect parallelism has on process creation.

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Interesting Stuff - Week 17

Throughout the week, I read a lot of blog-posts, articles, etc., that has to do with things that interest me

  • data science
  • data in general
  • distributed computing
  • SQL Server
  • transactions (both db as well as non db)
  • and other "stuff"

This is the "roundup" of the posts that has been most interesting to me, this week.

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Interesting Stuff - Week 16

Throughout the week, I read a lot of blog-posts, articles, etc., that has to do with things that interest me

  • data science
  • data in general
  • distributed computing
  • SQL Server
  • transactions (both db as well as non db)
  • and other "stuff"

This is the "roundup" of the posts that has been most interesting to me, this week.

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Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals IV

This post is part of a series of blog-posts about Microsoft SQL Server R Services:

  1. Microsoft SQL Server 2016 R Services Installation
  2. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals I
  3. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals II
  4. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals III
  5. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals IV (this post)
  6. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals V
  7. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals VI
  8. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals VII
  9. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals VIII
  10. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals IX
  11. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals X
  12. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XI
  13. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XII
  14. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XIII
  15. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XIV
  16. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XV
  17. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XVI
  18. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XVII
  19. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XVIII
  20. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XIX
  21. Microsoft SQL Server R Services - Internals XX
  22. More to come (hopefully)

This post is the fifth post about Microsoft SQL Server R Services, and the fourth post that drills down into the internal of how it works. In Internals - III, I wrote about how the launchpad service creates multiple processes when executing an external script.

Seeing that some of the conclusions I came to was somewhat educated guesses, I asked you guys to correct me where I was in-correct and/or add more information. After that post - Bob Albright (@bob_albright) - wrote me an email and pointed me to some resources around process creation, as well as some demo code. Thanks Bob!

So today we'll drill even further into the creation of processes, and see how they are used.

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SQL Server 2017 - Python Executing Inside SQL Server

On April 19, 2017 Microsoft held an on-line conference Microsoft Data Amp to showcase how Microsoft’s latest innovations put data, analytics and artificial intelligence at the heart of business transformation. The keynotes speakers were Scott "Red Shirt" Guthrie who is an Microsoft Executive Vice President (fairly high on the food-chain), and Joseph Sirosh a Corporate Vice President, head of the Information Management and Machine Learning group. Joseph probably knows a thing or two about data, and Scott - well, Scott knows A LOT!

During the keynotes, Scott and Joseph shared how Microsoft’s latest innovations put data, analytics and artificial intelligence at the heart of business transformation. A big enabler for this is SQL Server 2017 (the "artist" formerly known as SQL Server V.Next), which introduces a lot of very cool new "stuff".

The keynote speeches were followed by recorded short:ish sessions drilling down into certain aspects of Microsoft's new offerings. If you are interested in the various presentations at Microsoft Data Amp, they all are on Channel 9.

What caught my eye was the announcement of how SQL Server 2017 now supports Python as an extensible script engine. When Microsoft introduced support for R in SQL Server 2016, rumors immediately surfaced how other engines also would be supported, where Python was high on the list (Julia another one).

Seeing that I am somewhat into SQL Server R Services (the SQL Server 2016 flavor) here, here, here, here, and more posts to come, I really had to have a look.

The rest of this post is a brief introduction to executing Python code in SQL Server 2017, in essence I just want to be able to execute some sort of Python code.

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